NPT Lunch Truck: Audio Interviews With Nonprofit Leaders

July 29, 2015       Mark Hrywna      

NPT Lunch Truck is a brief audio interview with leading nonprofit executives on a hot issue of the day while you munch on that shrimp salad sandwich with the crusts cut off. The newsmaker will be interviewed by a member of the editorial staff of The NonProfit Times.

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This Week’s Newsmaker: World Vision was established in 1950 but it wasn’t until 2010 that it launched its first capital campaign. The five-year, $500-million campaign, For Every Child, ultimately surpassed its goal, raising $537 million for the Federal Way, Wash.-based charity. The Christian humanitarian charity — which started out as a child sponsorship organization — works with children, families, and communities worldwide to tackle the causes of poverty and injustice. Rachel Bjorklund, campaign director for World Vision USA, sits down with NPT Lunch Truck to talk about the capital campaign.

For Every Child aimed to expand high-net worth philanthropy and leverage World Vision’s infrastructure and scale around the world. Bjorklund discusses some of the challenges of launching an ambitious campaign, the power of major philanthropic gifts — such as $35 million from Dana and David Dornsife — and bringing donors more inside the process in appropriate ways and create opportunities for them to build relationships with each other.

Bjorklund also talks about the unique issues facing international relief organizations that solicit donations domestically as well as running a campaign to raise millions for a billion-dollar nonprofit. World Vision is typically among the top 20 largest organizations in the NPT 100, a study of the nation’s biggest nonprofits that generate at least 10 percent of revenue from public support, last year reporting revenue of almost $1.1 billion.

The quiet phase of World Vision’s next capital campaign already is under way too, including a donor task force specifically design around its feasibility study that Bjorklund said is critical to the planning process this time around.