Charity Defense Council Plans $1 Million March

August 18, 2014       Zach Halper      

How much is 60 miles worth? For the Charity Defense Council (CDC), the hope is that a 60-mile march from Maine to Massachusetts translates to $1 million to fund the anti-regulation organization’s operating budget.

The Cambridge, Mass.-based organization announced plans today for the Charity Defense March, which will take place from June 26 to June 28, 2015. Ending in Salem, Mass., Founder and President Dan Pallotta claims this will be the “largest demonstration of the sector, and for the sector” in the country.

“This is unlike any charity walk ever staged — it’s for the cause of causes themselves — charity, in solidarity, finally taking a stand for ourselves and our potential,” said Pallotta, a bit of a pied piper for anti-regulation. “It will be a professional and personal journey unlike any you’ve ever experienced, with sector leaders and foot soldiers from across the nation joining forces to change the way people think about change.”

CDC was founded in 2012 to change the way people think about the nonprofit sector. The money raised from the March will go directly to CDC’s mission. Pallotta believes that the public needs to change the way they look at how charities operate.

“Don’t judge a charity by its overhead. Judge a charity by its effectiveness,” he said, noting that just because one charity has higher overhead than another doesn’t necessarily mean it’s more or less effective.

He also said donors need to move past the “antiquated” idea that charities should limit the amount of money it pays its leaders. “We need to teach the public to look at the results a charity is achieving, not at the compensation for its leaders.”

Marchers will be required to pay a $99 registration fee. In addition, each registrant must pledge to raise a minimum of $2,995. Minors younger than age of 18 are also invited to march, and will be required to raise a minimum of $999. Completed registrations are due by May 26, 2015. Confirmed participants include Wounded Warrior Project CEO Steve Nardizzi, Share our Strength’s Billy Shore, and Kiva’s Matt Flannery.

Working at a nonprofit is not a requirement to joining the March, though Pallotta said he expects the vast majority of marchers to have some connection to the sector.

While the goal is to raise $1 million, Pallotta would not guarantee reaching that number nor would he rule out exceeding the goal amount. He also said they hope to have at least 500 marchers when the event begins.

Those interested in joining the March can sign up at