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Jobs > Career Tips > 4 Ways To Get Over Job Search Rejection

4 Ways To Get Over Job Search Rejection

May 9, 2013

What’s the feeling you have most during your job search? If your experience is like most job seekers, it can probably be summed up in one word: Rejected. The nature of today’s competitive job market means jobs are harder to come by than ever which means a ton of automated messages telling you someone else has been chosen for the position. How are you supposed to remain motivated when dealing with all of this rejection?

The first thing you have to do is something that is a lot easier said than done: Remain positive. While you are not getting the results you want, remind yourself that you are doing the best you can and that your search will come to a positive conclusion if you keep on working with the same effort. The one way to guarantee you will not get a job anytime soon is to fall into a depression and work with the mindset that you will never get employment.

Here are three other tips to keep your spirits up during your job hunt:

  • Work with the mindset that the employer that rejected you wasn’t right for you. Things always have a way of working themselves out and, when you finally do get hired, you might realize that getting rejected from that earlier “dream job” was the best thing that could have happened.
  • Stay active in the job search immediately after being rejected. Some suggest taking a break after a particularly difficult rejection, but you’ll be closer to getting chosen if you keep working. Even if you are not applying for jobs all the time, you should be doing something everyday to advance your job search, even if it’s just finding a new networking contact or updating your resume.
  • Keep all your negative feelings at home when you go to an interview. There’s no better way to lose an employer’s interest than by showing up to the interview with negative body language or a general lack of confidence. You should also not come off as desperate. Remember that other opportunities will arise even if you don’t get this job.

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