4 Dos And Don’ts For Your Online Job Search

May 28, 2013       The NonProfit Times      

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Searching for nonprofit jobs online is something of a double-edged sword. It’s both convenient and easy yet can be frustrating and time-consuming if not done correctly. Luckily, there are some simple steps you can take to make the process more bearable.

The job search has changed dramatically over the years with the proliferation of online job boards. While resume writing and networking still play a major role, job seekers no longer have to pound the pavement to find work. Nowadays, job applications can be sent to employers with just a simple click. There’s no doubt that adapting to this new world of job hunting can be overwhelming to those who were used to the old method, but luckily it’s not impossible.

Here are four things you should (and shouldn’t) do when beginning your online job search:

  • DO narrow your job search results: Most online job boards display all results by default. It can be somewhat overwhelming to see all of these jobs, so it’s recommended that you take advantage of the advanced search filters to narrow the results. Typical filters include: Date posted, salary range, city or state, job category, experience level, and company name.
  • DON’T use the same resume for every job: No two jobs are the same so it stands to reason that you shouldn’t use the same resume for application. If you are applying for an executive level position, for instance, it doesn’t make sense to use the same resume you used for a job much lower on the totem pole.
  • DO apply for multiple jobs per day: The more jobs you apply for, the better chance you will have of hearing back.
  • DON’T mention salary requirements unless specifically asked: Naming your price before you get to an interview can disqualify you before you even have a chance to talk to the hiring manager. Unless the job description specifically asks for it — and you should include a range in this case — you should wait to bring up money until you get to salary negotiations.